There comes a time driving either north or south on California Route 1 where you round a bend and Morro Rock just slaps you in the face. It’s unavoidable. The rock itself is a volcanic plug, the remnant of the neck of a volcano. In 1769, a Spanish explorer, Juan Crespi, noted in his diary that “we saw a great rock in the form of a round morro”. According to Google Translate ‘morro’ means ‘nose’ (or ‘snout’ according to my Oxford Spanish dictionary). Sometimes the foreign words are so much better.

Morro Rock, Morro Bay, California.

Morro Rock, Morro Bay, California.

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Actually a tad north of Corallina Cove, sunset on the California coast. Corallina Bay is actually behind the people on the bluff left of frame but is the closest named feature to these bluffs in the Montana de Oro State Park. It’s a great place to just listen to the waves rolling in and crashing against the bluffs. The trails are easy walking but along the bluffs themselves you need to be careful as you get closer to the edge. And the walk back to the car takes more effort as it’s uphill all the way.

Corallina Cove Sunset, California, USA

Corallina Cove Sunset, California, USA

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Pulteney Bridge in Bath, England, was built in 1774. It’s one of only four bridges in the world to have shops across the full span on both sides according to wikipedia. It’s form was altered within 20 years of opening, being widened and enlarging the shops. Shortly after it was damaged by flooding and debate over it’s rebuilding raged between the modernists and the classicists. The classicists won and it was rebuilt somewhat less ambitiously but more in keeping with the original design.

Pulteney Bridge, Bath, England.

Pulteney Bridge, Bath, England.

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In today’s photo, a group of work colleagues approach the gate on the western wall of Tagrifet Fort. I previously posted a photo of the fort from the air as the pilot approached the fort. He visually identified a place to land, landed on the sandy plain to the east of the fort and we scrambled up the bluff from the south. I suspect the fort was abandoned in WWII. All that’s left now is the stonework and the barbed wire defenses.

Tagrifet is an Italian Fort in Libya. Here a group of my colleagues approach the gate on the western wall of this triangular fort.

Tagrifet is an Italian Fort in Libya. Here a group of my colleagues approach the gate on the western wall of this triangular fort.

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