Pulteney Bridge in Bath, England, was built in 1774. It’s one of only four bridges in the world to have shops across the full span on both sides according to wikipedia. It’s form was altered within 20 years of opening, being widened and enlarging the shops. Shortly after it was damaged by flooding and debate over it’s rebuilding raged between the modernists and the classicists. The classicists won and it was rebuilt somewhat less ambitiously but more in keeping with the original design.

Pulteney Bridge, Bath, England.

Pulteney Bridge, Bath, England.

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In today’s photo, a group of work colleagues approach the gate on the western wall of Tagrifet Fort. I previously posted a photo of the fort from the air as the pilot approached the fort. He visually identified a place to land, landed on the sandy plain to the east of the fort and we scrambled up the bluff from the south. I suspect the fort was abandoned in WWII. All that’s left now is the stonework and the barbed wire defenses.

Tagrifet is an Italian Fort in Libya. Here a group of my colleagues approach the gate on the western wall of this triangular fort.

Tagrifet is an Italian Fort in Libya. Here a group of my colleagues approach the gate on the western wall of this triangular fort.

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Triple Falls, in North West Arkansas, would have been more appropriately named Trickle Falls on the day I visited. Below average rainfall meant that only about one and a half of the three falls were actually flowing. This was an even easier hike than the Kings River Falls hike, not even a hike really, just a few minutes from where we parked the car.

Triple Falls, Arkansas

Triple Falls, Arkansas

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The Kings River Falls are located near Witter in North West Arkansas. There wasn’t that much water flowing over the falls when I visited. The trip involves some driving along dirt roads – watch out for locals on tractors – and about a mile or so hike along a well worn footpath along the western river bank. It’s a pretty level hike but as I recall, one or two of the boulders on the path represented considerable steps. This is a view from the top of the falls looking down into the pool at the base. I’ve seen plenty of photos taken in times of greater flow where you just wouldn’t be able to stand where I was standing for this shot.

Kings River Falls, Arkansas

Kings River Falls, Arkansas

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Lobsters and Lighthouses, two excellent reasons to visit Maine. This is the Marshall Point Lighthouse which signals the eastern side of the southern entrance to Port Clyde harbor. In the mid 1800’s, Port Clyde was a major port with shipbuilding facilities and fish canning operations as well as supporting the shipping of granite from local quarries. Today it’s the home of the wonderfully named ‘Herring Gut Learning Center‘ which is a vital educational resource to the surrounding community. Love the headphone-wearing kid in the ‘U Mad Bro?’ t-shirt on their website though I think If I was in that room I’d be covering my nose rather than my ears!

The Marshall Point Lighthouse marks the eastern side of the south entrance to Port Clyde Harbor, Maine. USA.

The Marshall Point Lighthouse marks the eastern side of the south entrance to Port Clyde Harbor, Maine. USA.

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